FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

NEW PATIENTS

What should I bring with me on my first visit to the office as a new patient?
Your current insurance card, identification/driver’s license, and co-pay (if applicable) are required to complete the registration process. To expedite your visit, please bring any x-rays, MRIs, medical records, and contact information from your medical providers.
How long can I expect to be in the office for my first visit?
You can expect to be in our office about an hour to an hour 1/2 for your initial visit.
What should I expect as a patient at Interventional Pain and Spine Institute?
Interventional Pain and Spine Institute treats each patient as an individual, utilizing various diagnostic tests and procedures, your medical information, and personal goals to formulate your plan of care. Interventional Pain and Spine Institute seeks to aggressively diagnose conditions in order to give each patient an individualized treatment plan that will enhance the patient’s quality of life and maximize his or her level of function and independence. Prescriptions are written at the physician’s discretion. You are not guaranteed to receive a refill of medications just because prescriptions were written for those medications at your previous providers.

GENERAL

Why is an appointment required in order to get my prescriptions?
Because your health and safety are of the utmost importance to us, you must be seen by our healthcare professionals in order to monitor your response to medications and treatments we are providing.
Why do I have to provide a urine sample to receive pain medication?
If you do not receive pain medications from us, you MAY not be subjected to a UDS” uds are randomly selected.

SPECIAL PROCEDURES (Injections, EMGs, Spinal Cord Stimulator Trials)

Should I fast before coming in for a special procedure?
Fasting is required at least 6 hours prior to all procedures. if you are diabetic, you will be scheduled accordingly. please contact the office with any additional questions or concerns.
Should I take my medications before coming in for a special procedure?
If you take medications for hypertension, diabetes, or thyroid conditions, you should take these medications as prescribed, even on the day of the procedure. Please discontinue any anti-platelet or blood thinning medications for seven (7) days before the procedure. Examples: Coumadin, Plavix (Clopidogrel), Dipyridamole, Aggrenox, Reopro, Integrilin, Ticlid (Ticlopidine). If you take Aspirin, BC Headache Powder, Goody’s Headache Powder, or Excedrin Migraine you must stop these for five (5) days prior to your procedure. Discontinue all anti-inflammatory (NSAIDS or anti-arthritic) medications three (3) days before the procedure. Examples: Celebrex, Lodine (Etodolac), Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), Mobic, Aleve (Naproxen), Relafen (Nabumetone), Feldene (Piroxicam), Indomethacin (Indocin), Toradol (Ketorolac), Arthrotec, Daypro, Fiorinal, Voltaren.

INJECTIONS

Is it safe to take my regularly prescribed medications prior to my scheduled injection?
If you take prescription medications for blood pressure, diabetes, or thyroid conditions, you should continue taking these medications prior to the injection. Please discontinue any anti-platelet or blood thinning medications for 7 days before the procedure. Examples: Coumadin, Plavix (Clopidogrel), Dipyridamole, Aggrenox, Reopro, Integrilin, Ticlid (Ticlopidine). If you take Aspirin, BC Headache Powder, Goody’s Headache Powder, or Excedrin Migraine you must stop these for 5 days prior to your procedure. Discontinue all anti-inflammatory (NSAIDS or anti-arthritic) medications 3 days before the procedure. Examples: Celebrex, Lodine (Etodolac), Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), Mobic, Aleve (Naproxen), Relafen (Nabumetone), Feldene (Piroxicam), Indomethacin (Indocin), Toradol (Ketorolac), Arthrotec, Daypro, Fiorinal, Voltaren.
Can I drive myself to and from my scheduled injection?
You should arrange to have a responsible adult to stay in the office during the procedure and to drive you home after the procedure. Some procedures have associated, yet temporary, numbness, weakness, or loss of sensation which could make it difficult to operate a vehicle safely.